Only a third of MPs believe that A&E departments are adequately resourced 

Parliamentary perceptions of A&E departments |  A poll of UK MPs by Dods Research on behalf of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine

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A poll on behalf of  the Royal College of Emergency Medicine reveals just 33% of MPs believe emergency departments have the resources they need to keep patients safe.

The poll of 92 MPs of all parties and regions of the UK also found strong support for a transformation fund for emergency departments with four times as many saying they would support such an initiative as oppose it.

Over 60% of MPs said they would support Emergency Departments (EDs) receiving more money to help with the retention and recruitment of staff.

Despite government claims that the NHS was getting more than the minimum £8bn by 2020 it had asked for, the poll found that only half of Conservative MPs believe that Emergency Departments are currently being adequately resourced.

View the full report here

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ICT system to compensate for a sudden shortage of emergency department physicians

Tanaka, K. et al. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. Published online: 23 January 2017

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Background: A sudden shortage of physician resources due to overwhelming patient needs can affect the quality of care in the emergency department (ED). Developing effective response strategies remains a challenging research area. We created a novel system using information and communication technology (ICT) to respond to a sudden shortage, and tested the system to determine whether it would compensate for a shortage.

 

Discussion: After introducing the system, probability of multiple casualties increased. Thus the system may contribute to improvement in the ability to respond to sudden excessive patient needs in multiple causalities.

Conclusions: A novel system using ICT successfully secured immediate responses from needed physicians outside the hospital without increasing user workload, and increased the ability to respond to excessive patient needs. The system appears to be able to compensate for a shortage of physician in the ED due to excessive patient transfers, particularly during off-hours.

Read the full article here

Nurses’ Perceptions of Factors Involved in Safe Staffing Levels in Emergency Departments

Wolf, L. A. et al. Journal of Emergency Nursing. Published online: November 8 2016

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Introduction: The emergency department is a unique practice environment in that the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), which mandates a medical screening examination for all presenting patients, effectively precludes any sort of patient volume control; staffing needs are therefore fluid and unpredictable. The purpose of this study is to explore emergency nurses’ perceptions of factors involved in safe staffing levels and to identify factors that negatively and positively influence staffing levels and might lend themselves to more effective interventions and evaluations.

Methods: We used a qualitative exploratory design with focus group data from a sample of 26 emergency nurses. Themes were identified using a constructivist perspective and an inductive approach to content analysis.

Results: Five themes were identified: (1) unsafe environment of care, (2) components of safety, (3) patient outcomes: risky care, (4) nursing outcomes: leaving the profession, and (5) possible solutions. Participants reported that staffing levels are determined by the number of beds in the department (as in inpatient units) but not by patient acuity or the number of patients waiting for treatment. Participants identified both absolute numbers of staff, as well as experience mix, as components of safe staffing. Inability to predict the acuity of patients waiting to be seen was a major component of nurses’ perceptions of unsafe staffing.

Discussion: Emergency nurses perceive staffing to be inadequate, and therefore unsafe, because of the potential for poor patient outcomes, including missed or delayed care, missed deterioration (failure to rescue), and additional ED visits resulting from ineffective discharge teaching. Both absolute numbers of staff, as well as skill and experience mix, should be considered to provide staffing levels that promote optimal patient and nurse outcomes.

Read the abstract here