Towards evidence-based emergency medicine

Horner, D. (2017) Emergency Medicine Journal. 34(5) pp. 331-334.

BestBETS

Image source: BEstBETS

Best Evidence Topic reports (BETs) summarise the evidence pertaining to particular clinical questions. They are not systematic reviews, but rather contain the best (highest level) evidence that can be practically obtained by busy practicing clinicians. The search strategies used to find the best evidence are reported in detail to allow clinicians to update searches whenever necessary. Each BET is based on a clinical scenario and ends with a clinical bottom line which indicates, in the light of the evidence found, what the reporting clinician would do if faced with the same scenario again.

The BETs published below were first reported at the Critical Appraisal Journal Club at the Manchester Royal Infirmary or placed on the BestBETs website. Each BET has been constructed in the four stages that have been described elsewhere. The BETs shown here together with those published previously and those currently under construction can be seen at http://www.bestbets.org. Two BETs are included in this issue of the journal.

Read the full abstract here

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Practical Guidelines for the Use of Electronic Applications by Advanced Practice Nurses in the Emergency Department

Morgan, V.A. Journal of Emergency Nursing. Published online: October 20 2016

email-1345921_960_720Although numerous electronic applications are available to health care providers on enabled devices such as smartphones and tablets, these resources remain underutilized. Available literature suggests that utilizing electronic applications provides a number of benefits, including improved ability to make quick yet accurate decisions, improved knowledge of evidence based practices, a corresponding reduction in error rates, and an increase in quality improvement measures. These benefits translated into a reduction in adverse events and hospital lengths of stay.

Read the abstract here